Exhibits

Archives & Special Collections


black and white cartoon drawing of award-winning editorial cartoonist Bob EnglehartBob Englehart...In a Few Words

Richard Schimmelpfeng Gallery
Dodd Center for Human Rights
Monday - Friday, 9am to 4pm
On display through February 28, 2024


Enjoy a sampling of Bob Englehart’s cartoons created to provoke, anger, entertain, challenge and illustrate individuals, issues, events and change associated with politics and political elections…with a picture and in a few words.

Coming Soon! 


Black student protest in Wilbur Cross Library, from Archives & Special CollectionsPlease Respond Personally: 1974 Black Student Sit-In

Richard Schimmelpfeng Gallery
Dodd Center for Human Rights
Monday - Friday, 9am to 4pm
On display March 11 to July 19, 2024


An exhibition marking the 50th anniversary of the Black student sit-in at UConn where students of color made their demands for change by placing their bodies on the line. The Archives & Special Collections will display documents, photographs, and correspondence which highlight this historic event from the Spring semester of 1974 culminating in a direct action by roughly 400 students across 3 days in what was the main library located in Wilbur Cross on the Storrs campus.


Past Exhibits

Homer Babbidge Library


Women's hat from the UConn Costume CollectionFashionably Written: How books and magazines, clothes and accessories, are the fabric of our lives.

Gallery on the Plaza
Homer Babbidge Library 
On display through May 17, 2024

Opening Reception - Thursday, February 8 from 4-5pm

 


Take advantage of a rare opportunity to view UConn’s M. Estella Sprague Costume Collection. The collection, which dates back to 1898 when the Home Economics Department was created, contains garments and textiles from all over the globe, specializing in New England fashion. Curator Susan J. Jerome will use the exhibition space to help us understand how clothing plays a part in who we are and where we’ve been.

Online Exhibits


Image description: logo for exhibit titled 25 for 25, Celebrating Twenty-Five Years of Collecting

25 for 25: Celebrating Twenty-Five Years of Collecting

Online Exhibition, UConn Archives & Special Collections

Archives & Special Collections presents 25 for 25: Celebrating Twenty-Five Years of Collecting, a virtual, year-long exhibition celebrating collections and collecting. 2020 marks the 25th anniversary of the dedication of the Dodd Center for Human Rights, which brought together the collections and practices of the University’s Historical Manuscripts & Archives and Special Collections departments for the first time. Over the course of a year, Archives & Special Collections staff will explore 25 objects selected from the collections, engaging with and reflecting on the meaning of these objects and the activity of collecting over time. Through these objects, Archives & Special Collections celebrates the act of historical preservation and the recognition that collections constantly evolve, grow, and expand so that future educators, students, researchers, and learners may be inspired and informed by the objects within.


AMS Virtual Exhibit ImageThe American Approach to Montessori Teaching and Learning

Online Exhibition, UConn Archives & Special Collections

The Montessori method of education was first introduced to the United States in the early 1900s yet quickly fell out of favor with American educators. Widespread American interest in Montessori did not return until the 1950s, thanks in large part to teacher Nancy McCormick Rambusch. Rambusch founded the American Montessori Society in 1960, which sought to promote the Montessori method in the United States. AMS succeeded in reviving the Montessori method in the United States and gaining recognition for it as a valid educational system. This exhibit explores the origins of the Montessori movement in the United States and the Americanization of the Montessori method. It is comprised of materials from the American Montessori Society Records, which were donated to the UConn Archives in 2006 and digitized beginning in 2016.


Connecticut Businesses in WWIIHomefront: Connecticut Businesses in World War II

Online Exhibition, UConn Archives & Special Collections

The outbreak of World War II dramatically changed Connecticut businesses. Long a vibrant part of New England industry, local firms switched from making clocks and wool coats to mass producing artillery cartridges and Army pea-coats. Selections from the Connecticut business collections held by the University of Connecticut’s Archives & Special Collections paint a detailed portrait of this remarkable moment in history through the lives of the people who lived it.