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University of Connecticut University Libraries

Pamela Bramble and Frank Bramble: Remnants, Glyphs and Palimpsests

March 17 - May 16, 2008

Bright Sun Glyph, by Frank Bramble

Bright Sun Glyph, by Frank Bramble

Extrusion (Braced Glyph), by Frank Bramble

Extrusion (Braced Glyph), by Frank Bramble

Proud Sun (Braced Glyph), by Frank Bramble

Proud Sun (Braced Glyph), by Frank Bramble

Homer Babbidge Library Gallery on the Plaza and Stevens Gallery Curators: Michael Young and David Avery

Pamela and Frank Bramble will have a Gallery Talk of their artwork on Monday, April 21, beginning at 4:00 in the Stevens Gallery.

Artist’s Statement: Frank Bramble

For all of us, the passage of time and events alters things that once seemed certain. They become elusive. They drift away from the conscious mind and become the stuff of memory and even dream. Indeed, art itself is subject to neglect and decay. At times its existence is buttressed only by the extenuating formality built into the ongoing system of preservation defined by the museum and its methodology.

My travels, particularly in Central America, have profoundly affected my view of the abstract in art. To see all of those great structures—churches, temples, fortresses in ruin—parts of them held up with bracing and scaffolding, and all their form and function stripped away, led me to investigate the process of making and unmaking my own art.

In the twentieth century, abstract expressionist painters redefined the way in which the surface of a painting could be worked. Often, their work appears as a series of hypercatalectic strokes of energy captured within the confines of the canvas. Sometimes staccato, sometimes fluid, but always framed and contained and protected by the format of the object itself. Yet, as an artist I am always affected by the fugitive nature of the world around me. Things, people, the land and its structures, are all in the grip of entropy. I hope that is where my view of painting offers an exploration, the work of art seen as a kind of partial imprint, a survivor. Braced up as best as it can be, surviving on its own, as an object and a prod to memory; the fragility of the work of art becomes an evident counterpoint to its internal themes.

These paintings are offered as vignettes that suggest both an experience of art and its lasting impression. They strive for a combination of immediacy and reverie, achieving that balance through painterly application.

I have been painting for over thirty years. My work is in corporate, university and private collections across the country. I work as both an abstract and as a figurative artist, allowing the discipline of each of these forms to influence and develop the other. For me, there is a compelling symbiosis in these twin approaches to art and art making.

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